Liberty Intercept Blog

Corrosion Control - Cathodic Protection

Posted by Greg Spitz on Sep 17, 2016 8:31:52 AM

This piece is second in a series of posts on corrosion control.  The first post provided an introduction to corrosion control and gave an overview of some of the methods used.  Here, we are going to dive deeper into the world of cathodic protection, one of the more practiced and effective ways of controlling corrosion in process.  In a later post, we'll see how the principle of cathodic protection can be used in complex impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for delicate control over corrosion.  First, we need some background to understand how it all works.

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Topics: corrosion controls

Corrosion Control - Let's Break It Down

Posted by Elaine Spitz on Aug 1, 2016 4:16:14 PM

"Corrosion Control" generally refers to the implementation of measures to reduce or eliminate corrosion in:

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Topics: corrosion, corrosion controls

5 More Reasons for Packaging with Intercept

Posted by Joe Spitz on Mar 31, 2016 3:09:00 PM

Aren’t all anti-corrosion packaging materials the same?

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Topics: barrier packaging, Intercept Technology, anti-corrosion barrier packaging

The Big Three: Mechanical, Electronics & Optics

Posted by Greg Spitz on Feb 25, 2016 10:43:00 AM

In professional basketball there is an adage that two great players are good to have on a team but a “big three” is needed to win championships. That notion has been supported in the past and with current day teams.

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Topics: electronics packaging

Proposition 65: Good Intentions Gone Wrong

Posted by Greg Spitz on Jan 7, 2016 11:33:00 AM

In 1986 Californians voted into law Proposition 65, also known as The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, the purpose of which was to protect the people of California from exposure, via drinking water and consumer products, to toxic substances which have been linked to cancer or birth defects. The act gives authority to California's Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment to maintain a list of chemicals shown by the FDA or similar national organizations to be carcinogenic or cause birth defects. Any company found to be dumping any of these substances into drinking water sources can be fined and required to discontinue the dumping. The act also states that any company which exposes consumers to significant amounts of these chemicals via their products must provide a warning on the product or in the store. Failure to comply with the necessary warning means the company can be sued by state or city government attorneys or private attorneys given proper notice to the company and the Attorney General.

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Topics: vci, consumer products, quality assurance

25 Reasons to Save Materials and Reduce Waste

Posted by Elaine Spitz on Dec 12, 2015 9:46:00 AM

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines the concept of waste minimization as follows: the use of source reduction and/or environmentally sound recycling methods prior to energy recovery, treatment, or disposal of wastes.

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Topics: cost of goods reduction, quality assurance, how to reduce waste

Top 5 Questions About Intercept Technology Packaging

Posted by Greg Spitz on Nov 16, 2015 7:05:00 PM

Here are some of the questions we have received and answered most recently:

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Topics: barrier packaging, better packaging, Intercept Technology, anti-corrosion barrier packaging, Intercept barrier packaging products

The Martian - Part II - Adventure on the Rust Planet

Posted by Elaine Spitz on Oct 30, 2015 11:37:00 AM

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Topics: corrosion, rust, Static Intercept

Galvanic Corrosion: It's In Your Electronics

Posted by Greg Spitz on Oct 13, 2015 4:50:00 PM

Galvanic corrosion is a type of corrosion which occurs when two different metals are in contact with each other and an electrolyte.  Different metals will have different electric potentials when connected in this way.  This difference creates an electric current through the electrolyte.  In fact, the action of galvanic corrosion is the principle with which batteries are made.  Of course this is also the reason batteries have a shelf life.  The action of this circuit degrades whichever metal has a lower electric potential.  This is described as being less noble, whereas the metal with the higher potential is more noble. The degradation of the less noble metal eventually gets to the point that the circuit is broken by the oxides and salts created by the corrosion.  This is the reason not only for a battery’s eventual death, but also for the way it dies, slowly losing electric potential because the anode (lower potential metal or connection) is slowly destroyed by the action of galvanic corrosion.

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Topics: corrosion, chloride, reasons for packaging, electronics corrosion

Adventure on the Rust Planet: The Martian

Posted by Elaine Spitz on Oct 13, 2015 9:07:00 AM


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Topics: corrosion, Intercept Technology, reasons for packaging, rust

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