Liberty Intercept Blog

Chlorine, Pitting Corrosion and Intercept

Posted by Greg Spitz on Aug 24, 2015 6:48:00 PM

Chlorine is one of the most common elements found on Earth's crust.  The name comes from the Greek word for light green, which is how the gas appears in elemental form.  It has 17 protons and two stable isotopes giving it a standard atomic weight of 35.45, which makes chlorine the second lightest halogen.  It also has the highest electron affinity of any element making it a very strong oxidizer.  This means that chlorine will readily steal electrons from other elements.  In fact the vast majority of chlorine found on Earth is in the form of the chloride anion (a chlorine atom which has already stolen an extra electron), which will form ionic compounds with many cations (like metals).  It is in this form that humans are most familiar with chlorine, as in ionic compound sodium chloride, which we know of as table salt.  The chloride ion is important to many chemical and industrial processes including the making of usable chlorine and sodium hydroxide, and desalination and testing of potable water.

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Topics: corrosion, corrosion intercept, pitting corrosion, chloride

Boston Time Capsule Contents Exhibit - MFA

Posted by Elaine Spitz on Apr 11, 2015 10:29:00 AM

We continue our coverage of the Boston Time Capsule with updates from our recent visit to the Museum of Fine Arts, exhibit showing what was discovered inside the second Capsule recovered. The interest in this Time Capsule has been highly documented by many world news organizations because two well-known American patriots, Paul Revere and Sam Adams, were involved.

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Topics: boston, corrosion intercept, corrosion prevention, time capsule, archival, MFA

1795 Boston Time Capsule Opened

Posted by Joe Spitz on Jan 8, 2015 6:10:00 PM

220 years ago, founding-fathers and revolutionaries Paul Revere, Samuel Adams and  William Scollay placed a time capsule beneath a cornerstone of the Massachusetts State House. In December of 2014, water marks found near the cornerstone earlier in the year were examined, the result of which accidentally revealed the centuries-old box hidden in plaster. It took the Museum of Fine Art's Pam Hatchfield seven hours to free the delicate piece of history from its hiding place. The capsule then required another four hours to open the lid.  But once the MFA's head of objects conservation, Hatchfield, saw what was contained, she knew that those painstaking hours were worth it.

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Topics: boston, corrosion intercept, MFA, time capsule



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